invaderpichu: What do you think of the August Underground series?

While it is quite strong stuff, and difficult to watch, I can’t deny that there is an amount of artistic merit to it, because they present footage that very strongly sells the story they are trying to tell.  They also succeed in making the viewer very, very uncomfortable with the images they’re seeing, which—by all accounts—is a success, given this particular subgenre of horror.

Much like films such as Guinea Pig’s The Flower of Flesh and Blood (1985), it is not something that I would seek out in order to be entertained.  It is depravity for the sake of depravity.  It is more something fully intended to shock and disturb, and to test the limits of how far the viewer is willing to go along with the situation unfolding before them.

It is certainly not for the faint of heart, or weak of stomach.  However, for anyone wishing to test themselves, the third film in the series, August Underground’s Penance (2007), is up in full on Youtube.

Look, dude, it’s either in here, or in the closet.  You’re not a cat, and this is just getting ridiculous.

Look, dude, it’s either in here, or in the closet.  You’re not a cat, and this is just getting ridiculous.

(Source: tamy-sabry, via 365daysofhorror)

(Source: cinematicwasteland)

The Brain (1988)
While not the greatest horror flick to come out of the 80’s, this is still a fairly enjoyable film, featuring the late, great David Gale in yet another “mad scientist” role (though he doesn’t come close to his performance in his better-known role in Stuart Gordon’s Re-Animator that same year).

The Brain (1988)

While not the greatest horror flick to come out of the 80’s, this is still a fairly enjoyable film, featuring the late, great David Gale in yet another “mad scientist” role (though he doesn’t come close to his performance in his better-known role in Stuart Gordon’s Re-Animator that same year).

(Source: lump-things)

Dude, you reproduce from blisters on your back whenever you get hosed in a water fight.
There’s nothing there to flash. 

Dude, you reproduce from blisters on your back whenever you get hosed in a water fight.

There’s nothing there to flash. 

(Source: exploitastic)


“Sometimes the things you see in the shadows are more than just shadows.”

Sometimes the things you see in the shadows are more than just shadows.

(Source: mamajupe, via 365daysofhorror)

(Source: bleedingbrains)

omegaresnovae: Is 'The Stuff" available to watch for free online?

Why yes, it is! :D

It isn’t on the same level as some of Cohen’s other work, but I still really enjoy it, and Michael Moriarty is good in pretty much everything he does.

ciaobelatarr:

misterpancakes:

This movie is amazing.

the best horror flick that most ppl sleep on
and those whove seen this, fuck yeah 

Mo Rutherford is one of my favorite protagonists in the entire horror genre.

ciaobelatarr:

misterpancakes:

This movie is amazing.

the best horror flick that most ppl sleep on

and those whove seen this, fuck yeah 

Mo Rutherford is one of my favorite protagonists in the entire horror genre.

(Source: murduh, via classichorrorblog)

This skeleton is so hyped.  Look at him.  He’s so happy, he can hardly contain himself.

This skeleton is so hyped.  Look at him.  He’s so happy, he can hardly contain himself.

(Source: exploitastic)

(Source: exploitastic)

Suspiria (1977, dir. Dario Argento).

This photoset really captures one of my favorite aspects of Suspiria:  Argento’s use of colored lighting.  The entire film is bathed in a palette of primary colors, and it really lends the film a very surreal, dreamlike quality that enhances the overall atmosphere of fear and dread.

For being the director’s first real step firmly into the horror genre (his previous films had cemented his reputation as a master of the Italian giallo film, and Deep Red (1975) had elements bordering on horror), it is—with a doubt—masterfully done.  The film also boasts one of Jessica Harper’s first leading film roles, and undeniably one of her best.

(Source: sixv, via classichorrorblog)

bells12:

tenaflyviper:

brokehorrorfan:

August 25: Lucio Fulci’s Zombie (AKA Zombi 2) premiered 35 years ago today.

I’d just like to say here that not nearly enough credit is given to cinematographer Sergio Salvati, who helped paint the canvases of Fulci’s films with some truly beautiful lighting.  Even the most gruesome scene (such as the one depicted above) becomes a macabre work of art.  Look at how the lighting outlines and highlights each individual.  Simply remarkable work.

I really want/need to see this movie.

It is absolutely one of the quintessential zombie films.  Great lead performances from Tisa Farrow (sister of Mia) and Ian McCulloch, a beautiful, beautiful score by Fabio Frizzi (also a frequent collaborator of Fulci’s), and some really nice, very naturalistic effects work by Giannetto De Rossi.  It’s absolutely required viewing for zombie fans.
You can actually watch it online for free here, at Horror inc.  The site has a lot of other great zombie films, as well as other Fulci films, such as The Beyond (1981), and City of the Living Dead (aka The Gates of Hell) (1980), which are also both masterpieces of Italian horror.
Fulci may not have been the most pleasant director to work with (one wonders what the final score was of how many people he brought to the brink of tears), but he did have a keen eye for composition, and a definite flair for horror.

bells12:

tenaflyviper:

brokehorrorfan:

August 25: Lucio Fulci’s Zombie (AKA Zombi 2) premiered 35 years ago today.

I’d just like to say here that not nearly enough credit is given to cinematographer Sergio Salvati, who helped paint the canvases of Fulci’s films with some truly beautiful lighting.  Even the most gruesome scene (such as the one depicted above) becomes a macabre work of art.  Look at how the lighting outlines and highlights each individual.  Simply remarkable work.

I really want/need to see this movie.

It is absolutely one of the quintessential zombie films.  Great lead performances from Tisa Farrow (sister of Mia) and Ian McCulloch, a beautiful, beautiful score by Fabio Frizzi (also a frequent collaborator of Fulci’s), and some really nice, very naturalistic effects work by Giannetto De Rossi.  It’s absolutely required viewing for zombie fans.

You can actually watch it online for free here, at Horror incThe site has a lot of other great zombie films, as well as other Fulci films, such as The Beyond (1981), and City of the Living Dead (aka The Gates of Hell) (1980), which are also both masterpieces of Italian horror.

Fulci may not have been the most pleasant director to work with (one wonders what the final score was of how many people he brought to the brink of tears), but he did have a keen eye for composition, and a definite flair for horror.

In the scene where Elissa Neil’s character discovers her husband’s remains in their basement (shortly before famously having her face torn off), actor James Brewster fed his arm through the back of the mother spawn puppet in order to draw attention to the ring on his finger, which had been noted in an earlier scene, thus letting the audience know of his fate.

In the scene where Elissa Neil’s character discovers her husband’s remains in their basement (shortly before famously having her face torn off), actor James Brewster fed his arm through the back of the mother spawn puppet in order to draw attention to the ring on his finger, which had been noted in an earlier scene, thus letting the audience know of his fate.

(Source: lump-things, via vicecampaign)

brokehorrorfan:

August 25: Lucio Fulci’s Zombie (AKA Zombi 2) premiered 35 years ago today.

I’d just like to say here that not nearly enough credit is given to cinematographer Sergio Salvati, who helped paint the canvases of Fulci’s films with some truly beautiful lighting.  Even the most gruesome scene (such as the one depicted above) becomes a macabre work of art.  Look at how the lighting outlines and highlights each individual.  Simply remarkable work.

brokehorrorfan:

August 25: Lucio Fulci’s Zombie (AKA Zombi 2) premiered 35 years ago today.

I’d just like to say here that not nearly enough credit is given to cinematographer Sergio Salvati, who helped paint the canvases of Fulci’s films with some truly beautiful lighting.  Even the most gruesome scene (such as the one depicted above) becomes a macabre work of art.  Look at how the lighting outlines and highlights each individual.  Simply remarkable work.